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The technique

High performance treatment for horses

Neurocryostimulation

A powerful thermal shock

Carbon dioxide at -78°C and 50 bar pressure enable a drop in cutaneous temperature from 32°C to 4°C within 30 seconds.

THIS CUTANEOUS THERMAL SHOCK MUST BE ACHIEVED IN ONLY A FEW SECONDS IN ORDER TO TRIGGER A CENTRAL NEUROLOGICAL RESPONSE.


AUTONOMIC REFLEX

Once activated, cutaneous receptors send an alert signal to the brain. The latter responds immediately via the autonomic reflex system.

 
 

 

The power of the CO2 micro-crystals at a temperature of -78°C, combined with the speed of the drop in temperature and the vibration created by the jet, generates a high-intensity reaction called: THERMAL SHOCK.

 

External receptors of the skin are not aware of NCS (NeuroCryoStimulation) signal where as they are normally programmed to react with traditional cold treatments such as ice, sprays or forced air.

Accordingly, the autonomic reflex response that forms the basis of the NCS treatment is completely different and twice as powerful.

 

Example of treated pathologies

  1. Tendinopathy (lameness)
  2. Fetlock sprains
  3. Ligament inflammations
  4. Haematomas and oedema
  5. Muscular spasms (back pain)
 

 

Fetlock and ligament treatement

Physiological effects

The technique acts on the body's enzymes, vascular and lymphatic systems, and stimulates the cutaneous receptors.

  • Relieves pain immediately
  • Stops inflammatory crisis
  • Drains haematomas and oedema due to its vasomotor effect
  • Triggers immediate muscular relaxation
 
 

 

Witness

Dr F. Desbrosse : Equine Veterinarian, NCS user since 2002.

Clinique des Champs Labrosse (78)

 

Cryotherapy is an innovative analgesic and pain relief technique, which is easy to implement and is well supported by the animal. The first results are obtained quickly and are clinically observable.

There is a wide scope of application. Suitable for back pain, splints, epiphysitis, spasms, arthritis, peri-arthritis, tenosynovitis and bursitis, pain prevention and post-operative inflammation, tendinitis and haematomas.

 

Published in Pratique Vétérinaire Équine 2003 - Vol. 35, Special Edition